Capturing Nature’s Art


Recently, I had the pleasure and the privilege of being able to join some friends on a scenic, meandering drive along Maine’s coast, among tiny, hidden coves, past endless acres of pasture draped over the earth like Sir Walter Raleigh’s velvet cape over a puddle, the ocean lapping against the verdant fringe. During the drive, I noticed an interesting phenomenon. The further along our drive we went – and the further away from centers of activity – the quieter and more introspective we became. The excited chatter of friends catching-up gave way to silence laced with internal expressions of awe that couldn’t be contained.

Local Treasures


 Local Treasures By Cathleen Elise Rossiter  “The home should be the treasure chest of living.” – Le Corbusier – I once had a friend who moved to another part of the country when she married. As her husband was in the military, therefore away from home for long stretches, she had frequent visits from family…

Wishing It Were So


This week, while finally trimming the verge after weeks of wishing the garden were not so overgrown, the song “Wishin’ and Hopin'” sung by Dionne Warwick kept running through my head as well as the painting of the little girl gathering flowers by Jessie Wilcox Smith (above). The following fable with its corresponding lessons is the result of my latest encounters with art.

The Little Girl Who was Quite Fond of Wishing

Four Lessons I learned from Antonio Vivaldi: Spring’s First Lesson


With spring upon us, I thought it fitting that I explore what Antonio Vivaldi has to say to me through the first concerto of his Four Seasons, Spring …
Signor Vivaldi, I have learned, embodies the theme of Art Life Connection in that his music, particularly The Four Seasons, was inspired by the landscape paintings (the creative expressions of) Marco Ricci, a contemporary artist of Signor Vivaldi – in fact they both appear to have lived in Venice around the same time. Signor Ricci’s landscapes created a desire in Signor Vivaldi to replicate the scenes on the canvas in musical form. Art imitating life as imitated through the art of another – a beautiful cycle of creation.

When It Comes to Our Artistic Judgements, We’re All Freshmen


In the realm of the creative endeavors of others, our cocoons-of-the-moment wrap themselves around us readily, and often, without notice. We become so caught up in our interior universes, which we rule with the withering authority and dry wit of the Dowager Countess of Grantham, seeing all from the lofty heights upon which Superiority perches. We echo the sentiments of Clark Kellogg when faced with art that challenges us, our way of thinking, our superiority, our surety in life-as-we-know-it, “I don’t want to go to Palermo Sicily!”…

Facing Facts About Art I Don’t Like


In my journey to discovering the art that I enjoy – art that has something to say to me about my life, life in general, mankind, or what-have-you – I invariably encounter art that has the opposite effect on me. Not being one blessed with an effective Poker Face, my impression of the art in front of me is quite clear by my expression. Although I always try to be diplomatic (“my Mamma taught me right,” as my friend Nancy always says), the writer in me who simply must describe the precise reason or reasons why the art repulses me too often wins out – to the chagrin of those in my party (“Who’s she? Is she with you? NOT ME!”).

My high-mindedness regarding art began in grammar school…

Fried? Scrambled? Baked?: What Julia Roberts Taught Me About Art


In many ways, art can be intimidating. I remember my first visit to an official museum (as an eight-year-old, the various living history museums we regularly visited were too much fun to be seen as a museum to which sophisticated adults went)….The overriding feeling of that day, for me, is one of being swallowed by greatness, beauty, and the souls of the people who created everything around me. I could not tell you the specifics of which pieces were my favorites, although I do remember…

Beautiful Imperfections


“Perhaps, that is the way of friends, to love one another for their imperfections, not despite them.”
― Scott Wilbanks, The Lemoncholy Life of Annie Aster