Patience and Persistance: Revisited


Patience and Persistance: Revisited

By Cathleen Elise Rossiter

Degas
Edgar Degas, The Dance Class, c. 1873. Oil on canvas, 18 3/4 x 24 1/2 in. Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., William A. Clark Collection.
“Fear of repeating oneself, of repeating oneself may be the greatest bugaboo of late capitalist society. The fear has been marketed so effectively that a will to sustain attention on any one thing can be cancelled out easily in favour of the latest distraction.”

 –Jan Peacock –


As a child, I first encountered the work of Edgar Degas in an art book we kept on the coffee table in the living room. This book was, in the eyes of an eight-year-old, enormous; filled with glorious color reprints of a hundred or so masterpieces by celebrated artists of the ages – Rembrandt, Monet, Degas, Da Vinci, Copley to name the few that I remember as mesmerizing.

At eight years-old, I was infatuated with ballet. Although I did not take lessons (I tried once but the dance teacher, although a caring person, had no training in ballet – the Can-Can, yes. Ballet? No.) I spent all my time buried in books with photos or stories of the ballet, ballerinas, and the beautiful shoes and costumes the ballerinas wore. I do not know if I would have been any good at executing the art had I been able to pursue it, but I do know that at that time in my life, I was not ready for the discipline and patience necessary to persist in my pursuit of mastering the art form.

While looking for the quote to accompany this post, I encountered innumerable quotes about how life is not worth living in the face of repetition; that there is something inherently wrong with repeating a task, a statement, theme; that repetition in art is a sign of stagnation and a lack of talent.

I beg to differ.

Life is full of repetition that is useful and necessary for our physical, intellectual, emotional, and spiritual growth. Without repeating the fundamental movements involved in any art form, the beginner will remain just that, a beginner. No one would ever be able to become adept at any task if he or she only attempted the task once. Would you want a surgeon operating on you who had never performed the heart valve replacement you needed? Would Michelangelo be the artist and sculptor he was if he didn’t repeatedly try to master the techniques? Likewise for Mikhail Baryshnikov or Margot Fonteyn or any Olympic athlete.

In this day and age, we are told constantly to get on with our lives, to move forward. We live in a fast food, disposable world that is getting more impatient with every passing minute. This constant state of motion makes it difficult to be patient and to persist in learning to master something through repetition. It makes it difficult to see that in the repetition there is forward motion and growth. This week, I pledge to embrace repetition and the mastery of one job, task, or skill. I pledge to be persistent in my quest for growth in my chosen job, task, or skill. I pledge to repeat this persistence each week in order to get on with moving forward in my life – effectively; productively.

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